Launch Slideshow

Massively Stoned

Massively Stoned

  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/7cfd8569-52b1-449f-a67f-3b30b1f3f312_tcm52-469637.jpg

    300

    On Site
    November/December 2008

    Project Credits Builder:
    GN Contracting, Arlington, Va.; Architect: David Jameson Architect, Alexandria, Va.


    A vertical glass slot borders the chimney, letting extra daylight into the space.
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/956ac29b-3f92-4edc-b27a-ac96818dee21_tcm52-469644.jpg

    300

    On Site
    November/December 2008

    Project Credits Builder:
    GN Contracting, Arlington, Va.; Architect: David Jameson Architect, Alexandria, Va.


    The fireplace occupies the corner of the lower-level living room, freeing up the rest of that rear wall for views.
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/036CHDA_5210%20copy_tcm52-401029.jpg

    600

    Warren Jagger Photography

    2010 CHDA
    Custom Home of the Year
    Connors House, Westwood, Mass.
    Entrant/Architect:
    Estes/Twombly Architects, Newport, R.I.; Builder: Old Grove Partners, Needham, Mass.


    A granite fireplace and chimney anchors the west wall of the kitchen great room.
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/06fcf558-3cad-4998-96d6-ebe1d94ca6af_tcm52-465704.jpg

    457

    2008 CHDA
    Custom Home of the Year
    Walden, Colo., Residence
    Entrant/Architect:
    Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects, San Francisco; Builder: Byron Miller Construction, Arvada, Colo.; Photographer: David Wakeley


    The interior deploys archetypal Western imagery in service of Modernist design principles.
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/1f077224-b2eb-4240-ba66-a55e1adbfbbc_tcm52-469237.jpg

    600

    2008 CHDA
    Custom Home of the Year
    Walden, Colo., Residence
    Entrant/Architect:
    Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects, San Francisco; Builder: Byron Miller Construction, Arvada, Colo.; Photographer: David Wakeley


    With no high-ceilinged interiors-the better to stay cozy during mountain winters-the house shoots the moon with this two-story open porch.
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/822f94d3-714e-41c7-9c97-0b3ff9bbfde1_tcm52-469249.jpg

    600

    2008 CHDA
    Custom Home of the Year
    Walden, Colo., Residence
    Entrant/Architect:
    Turnbull Griffin Haesloop Architects, San Francisco; Builder: Byron Miller Construction, Arvada, Colo.; Photographer: David Wakeley


    With views that stretch for miles and nary a neighbor in sight, one does not need a porch railing for privacy.
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/CH060101086_ch-8_tcm52-851885.jpg

    600

    Art Grice

    On Site
    January/February 2006
    Builder:
    Landmark Construction, Kirkland, Wash.; Architect: Bernie Baker Architect, Bainbridge Island, Wash.


    A combination of timber framing and steel beams forms the house’s sturdy structure.
  • The kitchen/living pavilion has mahogany walls and ceilings, basalt flooring, white marble counters and fireplace, and stainless steel cabinetry.

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/tmpE9B3%2Etmp_tcm52-1252366.jpg

    The kitchen/living pavilion has mahogany walls and ceilings, basalt flooring, white marble counters and fireplace, and stainless steel cabinetry.

    600

    Maxwell MacKenzie

    2012 CHDA
    Renovation 308 Mulberry, Lewes, Del.
    Entrant/Architect:
    Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect, Washington, D.C.; Project architect: Brian Tuskey, Robert M. Gurney, FAIA, Architect; Builder: Ilex Construction, Easton, Md.; Photographer: Maxwell MacKenzie


    The kitchen/living pavilion has mahogany walls and ceilings, basalt flooring, white marble counters and fireplace, and stainless steel cabinetry.
  • Image

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/tmp289%2Etmp_tcm52-757662.jpg

    Image

    200

    On Site
    November/December 2004
    Builder:
    Heggenes Construction, Freeland, Wash.; Architect: Stuart Silk Architects, Seattle, Wash.; Photographer: Benjamin Benschneider


    Twin opposing shed dormers lighten the voluminous roof of the great room. The chimney “window” gives the second-floor loft a view of the public space below.
  • Image

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/tmpDDD%2Etmp_tcm52-764833.jpg

    Image

    200

    Custom Touches
    March 2006
    Quarry House
    Builder:
    Stonecraft Builders, Columbus, Ohio; Architect: Phillip Markwood Architects, Columbus; Photographer: Brad Feinknopf
  • Image

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/tmpDDE%2Etmp_tcm52-764840.jpg

    Image

    200

    Custom Touches
    March 2006
    Arch Rival
    Builder:
    Cal Parlman, Hudson, N.Y.; Architects: Jefferson B. Riley and Charles G. Mueller, Centerbrook Architects and Planners, Centerbrook, Conn.; Stonemason: Ken Makely, Hudson; Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink
  • Image

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/tmpDDF%2Etmp_tcm52-764845.jpg

    Image

    200

    Custom Touches
    March 2006
    Rock Star
    Builder:
    Michael Hewes & Co., Blue Hill, Maine; Architect: Elliott, Elliott & Norelius, Blue Hill; Stonemason: Freshwater Stone and Brickwork, Orland, Maine; Floor painting: Nicole Herz, Bar Harbor, Maine; Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink
  • Image

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/tmp3E%2Etmp_tcm52-754586.jpg

    Image

    250

    Custom Touches
    November/December 2003
    Fireside Seating
    Builder:
    Martha's Vineyard Construction, West Tisbury, Mass.; Architect: Mark Hutker Associates Architects, Vineyard Haven, Mass.; Stonemason: Kenneth Lane Stone and Fine Masonry, Aquinnah, Mass.; Photographer: Brian Vanden Brink
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/1406595666_BCJFire_tcm52-1792439.jpg

    600

    Nic Lehoux

    2011 rada
    Custom / More Than 3,000 Square Feet / Grand
    Lily Lake Residence, Dalton, Pa.
    Principal in charge:
    William D. Loose, AIA, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson; principal for design: Peter Q. Bohlin, FAIA, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson; project manager: Todd Howard, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson; general contractor: Warren Breig III, Breig Brothers, Dalton, Pa.; photography: Nic Lehoux


    The stone fireplace wall echoes the sites existing fieldstone walls.
  • Glass Farm House

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/496227658_OlsonFIre_2_tcm52-1792465.jpg

    600

    John Clark

    2011 rada
    Custom / 3,000 Square Feet or Less / Merit
    Glass Farmhouse, Eastern Oregon
    Design principal:
    Jim Olson, FAIA, Olson Kundig Architects; project manager: Ellen Cecil, AIA, LEED AP, Olson Kundig; architectural staff: Michael Wright, Olson Kundig; general contractor: Louis Perry, LD Perry, Joseph, Ore.; photography: John Clark


    Glass walls usher in views of the bucolic northeastern Oregon environment. The scenery is the luxury, explains Jim Olson, FAIA.
  • Glass Farm House

    http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/126490464_OlsonFire_1_tcm52-1792456.jpg

    600

    John Clark

    2011 rada
    Custom / 3,000 Square Feet or Less / Merit
    Glass Farmhouse, Eastern Oregon
    Design principal:
    Jim Olson, FAIA, Olson Kundig Architects; project manager: Ellen Cecil, AIA, LEED AP, Olson Kundig; architectural staff: Michael Wright, Olson Kundig; general contractor: Louis Perry, LD Perry, Joseph, Ore.; photography: John Clark


    A heated concrete slab keeps the interiors toasty all year round, and it works well as thermal mass for passive solar. Cross-ventilation throughout the house allows for natural cooling during the warmer months.
  • http://www.customhomeonline.com/Images/1281678867_NoyesFire_tcm52-1792447.jpg

    600

There’s something about a big stack of rocks around a roaring fire that amplifies the visual as well as literal warmth of a room. The inherent heft and organic forms provided by stone hearths, mantles, and chimneys serve to anchor surrounding spaces. The material connects interiors to the natural environment, especially when designers or builders select a local variety or incorporate pieces found on site. It also evokes an atmosphere of times past and wilder places, even when applied in a modern setting.  Stone’s multilayered looks and complex characteristics make it a common choice for creating oversized fireplaces that become focal points in large, airy rooms.

The architects, designers, builders, and stone masons who produced the fireplaces in the accompanying slideshow all took different approaches while still respecting the material’s qualities and the context in which it was being used. Some chose to incorporate behemoth boulders stacked in a seemingly precarious manner to add a touch of whimsy. Others opted for symmetrical pieces in cut and polished presentations as a way to incorporate a rustic material into a sleek design. The types, colors, shapes, sizes, styles, and settings used in this collection vary widely, but one thing they all share is masterful construction. Architects and builders agree that it requires both brute strength and delicate precision to create these stone masterworks.