• A track lighting system within a metal framework lets owners switch from pendant to track fixtures or back again with ease. Circles cut into the glass make changing overhead bulbs a breeze.

    Credit: Julia Heine

    A track lighting system within a metal framework lets owners switch from pendant to track fixtures or back again with ease. Circles cut into the glass make changing overhead bulbs a breeze.
This dining table with glass canopy is part of “one of the biggest renovation projects we've ever done,” says architect Mark McInturff, who renovated the whole house while also adding several outbuildings and four pools. But per the owner's wishes, it's the 400-square-foot dining room that's the heart of the project. McInturff designed a table that expresses the importance of gathering for meals as well as addresses the owner's other major request: “She wanted a really strong connection to the outdoors,” McInturff says, “and since she can't live near the ocean, she asked us to bring the ocean to her.” Thus glass for the dining canopy is rendered in a watery hue through the use of colored film. A metal armature holds pieces in place and supports the slab of mahogany for the table.

  • Credit: Julia Heine

The glass and metal sculpture climbs from floor to ceiling then turns to cover the dining table and continues outside as an awning that cantilevers beyond balcony rails. “It took a lot to make this all work out,” said the admiring jurors.

Project Credits
Entrant/Architect:
McInturff Architects, Bethesda, Md.
Builder: BOWA Builders, McLean, Va.
Metal fabricator: AK Metals, Alexandria, Va.
Project size: 400 square feet (dining room only)
Construction cost: Withheld
Photographer: Julia Heine

Resources: Entry doors/windows: Hopes; Kitchen plumbing fittings: Dornbracht; Paints: Benjamin Moore.